Many people remember either having chickenpox or seeing it on someone else. The itchy, red bumps caused by varicella, the chickenpox virus.

SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS
The first symptoms of chickenpox usually include fever, feeling ill, sore throat, and loss of appetite.
The rash associated with the infection (picture 1) usually does not develop until a day after these symptoms begin. The chickenpox rash starts out as clusters of small, usually itchy, red blisters that eventually blister and then pop (picture 1). After bursting, the blisters dry up, crust, and form scabs. The rash tends to form on the face, chest and back, or limbs, and new clusters of blisters continue to appear for a few days.
New blisters can develop throughout the body for about four days following the first sign of the rash. By day six, the blisters have completely scabbed over in most healthy people. The scabs then take a week or two to fall off, and may leave marks on the skin that take time to fade.
Spreading of the infection

you can become infected by breathing in airborne traces of the virus or touching an area of chickenpox rash on an infected person. Chickenpox is highly contagious, and an infected person can spread the infection even before developing a rash or showing any signs of being sick.
After being exposed to the varicella virus, you will begin to show symptoms about two weeks later. This period following exposure and preceding the onset of symptoms is called the incubation period. You can start spreading the virus during this period, starting two days before you show signs of a rash. You remain contagious until the last of the bumps have completely scabbed over. During this time, persons with chickenpox should avoid contact with others who might be susceptible. This may mean staying home, away from other children and adults.

Although chickenpox is generally a mild illness in children, susceptible adults and other high risk persons may become seriously ill after exposure. These risk groups include:

Pregnant women

Newborn babies

People whose immune systems may be compromised, including those with HIV, or who have received an organ or bone marrow transplant.

If you develop chickenpox, you should avoid contact with people at high risk for chickenpox complications until your lesions are scabbed over.

Catching chickenpox from someone having it —

Children or adults who have never had chickenpox or the varicella vaccine can develop chickenpox by breathing in virus particles that are airborne following exposure to a person with widespread shingles, although this is uncommon.

Can  chickenpox happen twice? —

Most people who have had chickenpox do not develop chickenpox a second time. However, there are rare cases in which a person can develop chickenpox a second time. In some people, the virus can resurge later in life, causing a related condition called shingles,

Prevention also means to help retard the process of disease, the pace or speed of disease, prevent its complications, prevent early deterioration. All this would help a better quality of life.

Homoeopathy and chickenpox
Homoeopathy is used in the treatment of chicken pox. Different remedies are prescribed for treating chicken pox in Homoeopathy. The medicines like Antimonium tartaricum, Antimonium crudum, Apis mellifica, Belladonna, Bryonia, Mercurius solubilis, Pulsatilla, Rhus toxicodendron, Hepar Sulph, Urtica urens, etc. are used most commonly for treatment of chicken pox. These medicines are applied on a case by case basis. Medicines should be taken under a qualified homeopathic physician’s treatment.